Wednesday
Apr252012

Mystery fossil unveiled at Dayton, Ohio GSA meeting

Amateur paleontologist Ron Fine of Dayton, Ohio recently unveiled a 450 million-year-old fossil which he dubbed as “Godzillus.” He discovered the fossil last year in Northern Kentucky a year ago and presented it during a Geological Society of America meeting at the Dayton Convention Center.

The elliptical-shaped specimen measures 3.5-foot wide by 6.5-foot long and is believed to be the largest fossil recovered from the Cincinnati area. The question at the GSA meeting was whether it was animal, vegetable or mineral. “We are looking for people who might have an idea of what it is,” said Ben Dattilo, an assistant professor of geology at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, who is researching the discovery.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/dayton-news/dayton-mans-record-fossil-find-remains-unidentified-1365237.html

Tuesday
Mar202012

Some good geology fun

Even TV cameras can't excite geologists

http://i.imgur.com/p6te5.jpg

Tuesday
Jan032012

Incredible Landscapes Carved Into Books

This website shows some truely amazing artwork that should capture the hearts of earth scientists and artists alike.

http://twistedsifter.com/2012/01/landscapes-carved-into-books-guy-laramee/

Thursday
May262011

IDEM Remediation Closure Guide [DRAFT]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management has issued their draft of the Remediation Closure Guide (available here http://www.in.gov/idem/6683.htm). This guide is intended as a replacement of the RISC Technical Guide, and to serve as the de facto guidance document for all environmental investigations to be performed under IDEM's regulatory programs.

Of note, the guidance document explicitly requires the development of a Conceptual Site Model of its investigated sites. The CSM is to integrate hydrogeologic settings, land use, identification of contaminants and their phases, plume characterization, and possible off-site and natural sources. We applaud this approach and believe that its implementation will result in more thoughtful and efficient investigations that will be a benefit to the citizens of Indiana.

 

Monday
May232011

Gamma Ray Logs

Gamma ray logging is a borehole tool that can provide useful information for environmental and engineering investigations and water resource exploration. In practice, the tool is sensitive to clay content, and functions as a sand/clay log for unconsolidated sediments, or a shale log in rock sequences. The method measures natural gamma irradiation from radioactive isotopes in the sediment/rock minerals. Potassium is the most common radioisotope in surficial geologic materials in the Midwest.

It is particulary helpful for wells with poor or absent boring logs, and can be useful in lithologic correlations. The method ties well with observed lithologic profiles and can be used to help constrain earth resistivity surveys. Ned Bleuer has applied gamma logging to the analysis of glacigenic facies (Indiana Geological Survey Special Report 65).

Gamma ray logs can be obtained from in situ wells and cased boreholes. Because it detects natural gamma radiation, there is no radioactive source within the tooling, and no NRC permitting is required.